Category: Coins American


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Denomination – 25 Pesos
Country – Mexico
Year – 1986
Mint – Mexico
Head Of State – President Miguel De La Madrid
Obverse – Lettering: Estados Unidos Mexicanos – Proof national Coat of Arms on a mirror-finish background. A golden eagle stands on a cactus, devouring a serpent
Reverse – The reverse features the denomination of 25 Pesos along with a soccer ball within net and the logo for the 1986 World Cup, and below that, the Mexican Mint mint mark. Along the right border is “Copa Mundial De Futbol” (World Cup of Football).Lettering: Copa Mundial De Futbol – Mexico 86 – 1986
Metal – Silver 1/4 oz
Fineness – 92,5%
Condition – Proof
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  – 26.0 mm
Weight – 8,41 gr
Edge – Smooth
Melt Value – 7.09 USD (as of 28/03/2013)
Value – 15,00 USD (Source NGC Coins)
Krause : KM#519

This 1985 Mexican 25 Peso ¼ oz “World Cup” Proof Silver Coin was part of a series of commemorative coins celebrating Mexico’s hosting of the 1986 World Cup. This coin was also offered as Proof in 1986 individually and as part of a set. This coin contains 1/4 oz of silver and comes with the official 1986 World Cup logo.

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1976S_1__43663.1354836273.1280.1280

Denomination –  1 Quarter (0,25 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  1976
Head Of State – President Gerald Ford  
Mint – San Francisco
Obverse – George Washington –  Double date 1776–1976
Reverse – Colonial Drummer Boy
Metal – Outer Layers (80% Silver, 20% Copper) Center (20.9% Silver – 79.1% Copper)
Condition – Uncirculated
Edge – Reeded
Mintage – 4,908,319
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  –  24.3 mm
Weight – 5.70 gr
Designer – Obverse John Flanagan – Reverse Jack L. Ahr

This important coin was the first Washington quarter without the eagle reverse! Issued more than two decades before the 50 State series, this original no-eagle quarter with the Colonial Drummer reverse is needed by any collector putting together a date and mint mark set of Washington or Statehood quarters – no collection is complete without it! And this 1776-1976 Bicentennial quarter isn`t just any quarter… it`s a Proof from San Francisco created especially for collectors. Instead of the usual copper-nickel clad, this quarter was minted in 40% silver. Plus, it has the lowest mintage of all 1976 Washington quarter issues. While regular-issue Bicentennial quarters are occasionally found in pocket change, this special 40% silver Choice Proof coin is not. Don`t miss your opportunity to add the very first no-eagle Bicentennial quarter to your collection!

Walking Liberty Coin U.S.A. PCGS MS-69 1oz of Silver

Denomination –  Walking Liberty Half Dollar (0,50 Cents)
Country –  U.S.A.
Year – 2011
Head Of State – President Barack Obama
Mint – San Francisco
Obverse – Lady Liberty walking and holding branches;United States flag over shoulder
Reverse – A bald eagle rising from a mountaintop perch
Metal – 99,93 Silver – 0,07 Copper
Condition – Uncirculated – PCGS Certified and Graded MS-69
Creator – Adolph A. Weinman (Obverse) – John Mercanti (Reverse)
Edge – Reeded
Mintage – 950,000 (Proof)
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  – 40,60 mm
Weight – 31,10 gr
Interesting Facts – The Walking Liberty Half Dollar was introduced in 1916 to replace the Barber Half Dollars series, which concluded in the previous year. The new series was the result of a design contest for a new half dollar. The winner of the contest was Adolph A. Weinman, who was also the winner of a contest to redesign the dime. His new design for the half dollar was extremely popular and has become an iconic representation of America.The obverse design of the Walking Liberty Half Dollar features a full figure of Liberty in a flowing gown with an American flag draped around her shoulders. As the series name suggests, she is walking forward, appearing as facing left on the coin. One arm is outstretched and the other holds a bouquet of olive branches. The sun is rising before her with with inscription “Liberty” widely spaced above and “In God We Trust” behind her.The reverse design of the coin features an eagle facing left, perched on a rock ledge with a twisted branch extending. The eagle’s wings are raised in a stance described as defiant or perhaps ready to take flight. “United States of America” appears above with “E Pluribus Unum” to the left of the eagle and the denomination “Half Dollar” below.

The Walking Liberty Half Dollar series contains a number of lower mintage dates which are considered key dates or semi-key dates. The two lowest mintage coins are among the  1921 Walking Liberty Half Dollars. The mintages for the Philadelphia and Denver strikes were 246,000 and 208,000, respectively. Other low mintage issues include the 1916, 1916-S, 1921-S, and 1938-D.

Proof coins were struck for the series only from 1936 to 1942. The mintage for the first proof issue was a mere 3,901 coins, but the figure steadily rose each year until 21,120 proof coins were minted in 1942. After that year, the production of proof coinage was suspended.

The Walking Liberty Half Dollar series concluded in 1947, when it was replaced by the Franklin Half Dollar. This design change also completed the transition from depictions of Liberty on circulating American coinage to depictions of historical Americans. The Walking Liberty design was later used on the American Silver Eagle bullion coin series, which began in 1986.

Walking Liberty Halves, “Walkers” as they are frequently called, are heavily collected due to their beauty.  They hold great appeal for traditional collectors as well as non collectors.  Over 485 million of these coins were produced between 1916 and 1947 with many that still exist in MS65 condition or better.  A full set of 65 different date-and-mint combinations can be bought for around $1000 in average circulated condition (AG-VG for earlier years and F to XF for later years) making this series achievable for many collectors.  As always, coins in higher grades and mint state condition will command huge premiums. 

You can also start with what is called the short set with are coins dated from 1941 to 1947 which is 20 coins.  Acquiring these in better grades can be very rewarding. 

One thing to look for in high grades is weakness of strike.  Most dates are weakly struck, particularly on Liberty’s left hand and leg, head and skirt lines and on the eagle’s breast and leg feathers. As you would guess, sharply struck coins typically demand substantial premiums. An effort to improve this issue was attempted by Chief Engraver George T. Morgan in 1918 and again by Assistant Engraver John R. Sinnock in 1937 and 1938. None of the revisions seemed to help though as later issues were still weak in the central parts of the design. Places to check for wear and weakness include Liberty’s head, breast, arms and left leg and the breast, leg and forward wing of the eagle.

Value – 59,95 USD http://silvereagleguide.com/2011-silver-eagle/


Denomination –  1 Dime (0,10 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  1935
Head Of State – President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Mint – Philadelphia (No Mintmark)
Obverse – Image of Liberty wearing a Phrygian Cap, Date 1935, In God We Trust, Designer’s Monogram
Reverse – A Fasces juxtaposed with an olive branch (symbolizing America’s readiness for war, combines with its desire for peace. United States Of America – E Pluribus Unum
Metal – 90% Silver- 10% Copper
Condition – Almost Uncirculated
Creator –Adolph A. Weinmann
Catalogue – KM#140
Edge – Reeded
Mintage – 58,830,000
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  – 17,90  mm
Weight – 2,50 gr
Interesting Facts – Although most commonly referred to as the “Mercury” dime, the coin does not depict the Greek messenger god. The obverse figure is a depiction of the mythological goddess Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap a classic Western symbol of liberty and freedom, with its wings intended to symbolize freedom of thought. It is considered one of the most beautiful coin designs ever produced. The fasces symbol on the reverse of the coin was adopted by the Italian National Fascist Party of Benito Mussolini.
Of particular interest is the condition of the horizontal bands tying together the bundle on the fasces, on the coin’s reverse. On well-struck examples, separation exists within the two sets of bands (known as Full Split Bands). Coins exhibiting this feature are typically valued higher than those without it
Rare Dates:1916-D; Scarce Dates:1921, 1921-D, 1926-S, 1931-D, 1931-S
Krause Value – 7.15$ (Unc)Melt Value (2,01$ – 03/01/2012)
Denomination –  1 Dime (0,10 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  1989
Head Of State – President George H.W. Bush
Mint – Philadelphia
Obverse – The portrait in left profile of Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 to his death in 1945, accompanied with the motto: “IN GOD WE TRUST” and surrounded with the lettering “LIBERTY”. Philadelphia “P” 1980-date
Lettering: LIBERTY – IN GOD WE TRUST – 2005 P – JS
Reverse – Ahead the motto “E • PLU RIB US • U NUM”, an olive branch, a torch and an oak branch symbolize respectively peace, liberty and victory and are surrounded with the facial value and the lettering “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA”
Lettering: E • PLU RIB US • U NUM – UNITED STATES OF AMERICA • ONE DIME •
Metal – Outer layers – 75% copper and 25% nickel bonded to an inner core of pure copper
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – John R. Sinnock
Catalogue – http://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces53.html
Edge – Reeded (118 reeds)
Mintage – 1.298.400.000
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  –  17,91 mm
Weight – 2,27 gr
Interesting Facts –  Early Roosevelt dimes were made of 90% silver and 10% copper (1946-1964). Dime pieces from 1964 forward are clad coinage consisting of copper sandwiched between two layers of an alloy that is 75% copper and 25% nickel.Beginning in 1992, silver coins were included in yearly collectors sets produced by the US Mint. These 90 percent silver proof coins include the Roosevelt Dime, Washington Quarter and Kennedy Half Dollar.
Image Taken from UCoins.net website
Denomination –  1 Cent (0,01 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  1963
Head Of State – President John F. Kennedy
Mint – Denver
Obverse – Abraham Lincoln, In God We Trust, Liberty, 1963
Reverse – E Pluribus Unum, One Cent, Unites States Of America, Two Wheat Stalks
Metal – 95% Copper – 5% Zinc
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Frank Gasparro
Catalogue –  KM #201
Edge – Plain
Mintage – 1,774,020,400
Collection – Giannis Katopodis
Diameter  –  19.0 mm
Weight – 3.11 gr
Interesting Facts –  The Lincoln cent coinage represented new directions the mint had begun taking. Of the most notable is that it was the first circulating coin to feature a portrait of an actual person and not that of lady liberty. This spelled the beginning of the end for lady liberty on other denominations in years to come.Being the first coin to depict a real person is not the only “first” status that the cent can claim to. The Lincoln cent was also the first to bear the term “IN GOD WE TRUST”, the first cent ever to be minted at the Denver Mint, and in WWII issue the first and only U.S. circulating coin made of steel. MS60 prices are for Brown coins and MS65 prices are for coins that are at least 90% original red. The dates were modified in 1960, 1970 and 1982, resulting in large-date and small-date varieties for those years.
Krause Value – 12,00 $ (MS-65)
Denomination –  5 Cents (0,05 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  2005
Head Of State – President George W. Bush
Mint – Philadelphia
Obverse – Thomas Jefferson large profile, 3rd President of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence. Mintmark “P” of Philadelphia Mint
Reverse – American Bison – E Pluribus Unum (One, out of many)
Metal – 75% Copper – 25% Nickel
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Obv. Designer: Joe Fitzgerald and Don Everhart II – Rev. Designer: Jamie Franki and Norman E. Nemeth
Catalogue – KM#368
Edge – Smooth
Mintage – 448.320.000
Collection – Giannis Katopodis
Diameter  – 21,21 mm
Weight – 5,00 gr
Interesting Facts – The 1938 through 1942 D versions of the nickel are also made of the same composition, but generally are sold for a premium over their melt value due to rarity. 0,05053606 was the melt value on December 18,2011.As of March 14, 2011, the value of the metal in a nickel is $0.0665396, 33.07% more than its face value. 
Krause Value – 1,00$ (MS-65)
Image taken from UCoins.net website
Denomination –  5 Cents (0,05 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  2005
Head Of State – President George W. Bush
Mint – Philadelphia
Obverse – Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence.
Reverse –  Westward Journey Series including “American Bison” and “Ocean in view! O! The joy!”.
Metal – 75% Copper – 25% Nickel
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Obv. Designer: Joe Fitzgerald and Don Everhart – Rev. Designer: Joe Fitzgerald and Donna Weaver
Catalogue – KM#369
Edge – Radical
Mintage – 394,080,000
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  – 21,2 mm
Weight – 5,00 gr
Interesting Facts – The 1938 through 1942 D versions of the nickel are also made of the same composition, but generally are sold for a premium over their melt value due to rarity. 0,05053606 was the melt value on December 18,2011.As of March 14, 2011, the value of the metal in a nickel is $0.0665396, 33.07% more than its face value. The final Westward Journey nickel reverse  depicts the Pacific Ocean and the words from William Clark’s diary upon reaching it. In a controversial move, the U.S. Mint decided to amend Clark’s actual words. He had originally written, “Ocian in view! O! The Joy!” but as the spelling “ocian” is nonstandard (and might have led to hoarding in the mistaken belief that the Mint had made an error that would soon be corrected), the U.S. Mint decided to modify it to “ocean”
Krause Value – 1,00$ (MS-65)
Denomination –  1 Cent (0,01 Dollars)
Country –  United States Of America
Year –  1957
Head Of State – President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Mint – Philadelphia
Obverse – Abraham Lincoln, In God We Trust, Liberty, 1957
Reverse – E Pluribus Unum, One Cent, Unites States Of America, Two Wheat Stalks
Metal – 95% Copper – 5% Zinc
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Victor David Brenner
Catalogue –  KM #132
Edge – Plain
Mintage – 282,540,000
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  –  19.0 mm
Weight – 3.10 gr
Interesting Facts – Mint Mark Appears Only in Denver and San Francisco Issues. All other coins were minted in Philadelphia. The Lincoln cent coinage represented new directions the mint had begun taking. Of the most notable is that it was the first circulating coin to feature a portrait of an actual person and not that of lady liberty. This spelled the beginning of the end for lady liberty on other denominations in years to come.Being the first coin to depict a real person is not the only “first” status that the cent can claim to. The Lincoln cent was also the first to bear the term “IN GOD WE TRUST”, the first cent ever to be minted at the Denver Mint, and in WWII issue the first and only U.S. circulating coin made of steel.
Krause Value – 9,00 $ (MS-65)

Denomination –  50 Cents (0,50 Dollars)
Country –  United Stated Of America
Year –  1965
Head Of State – President Lyndon B. Johnson
Mint – 1965-1970 Kennedys were minted in Denver and San Francisco, but…due to the Coin Act of 1965, coins were not mint marked for 3 years, so 1965-1967 Kennedys could have been struck anywhere, although Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco are the most likely candidates.
Obverse – John F. Kennedy, 35th President of the United States
Reverse – Eagle holding an olive branch (peace) and arrows (strength). The thirteen stripes represent the 13 colonies. The horizontal bar across the top represents Congress forming one government from many. Fifty stars representing the fifty states encircle the eagle
Metal – 40% silver, 60% copper
Condition – Extremely Fine
Creators – Obverse: Gilroy Roberts, Reverse: Franc Gasparro
Catalogue – KM#202a
Edge – Reeded
Mintage – 65,879,366
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  – 30.60 mm 
Weight – 11.50 gr
Interesting Facts – Kennedy halves are interesting enough, but with 40-90% silver content (1970 and earlier with some outliers), silver collectors keep their eye out for them too.With the price of silver going up in 2009, it’s no wonder they’re so popular with silver collectors, with a silver weight of .1479 to .36169 ounces of silver per coin.
Krause Value – 3,40 $ (MS-60)