Archive for January, 2012


Denomination –  2 Euros
Country –  Slovenia
Year –  2010
Head Of State – Prime Minister Borut Pahor
Mint – Rahapaja Oy, in Helsinki-Vantaa, Finland
Obverse – The inner part of the coin depicts the Rebrinčevolistna Hladnikija plant.
On the left under the plant, its name ‘HLADNIKIA PASTINACIFOLIA’ is written in an arc.
Around the image in a circle is the legend ‘SLOVENIJA 2010. 200 LET. BOTANIČNI VRT. LJUBLJANA.’
The outer ring of the coin depicts the 12 stars of the European flag.
Reverse – The reverse (used from 2007 onwards) was designed by Luc Luycx and displays a map of Europe, not including Iceland and cutting off, in a semi-circle, at the Bosporus, north through the middle of Ukraine and Belarus and through northern Scandinavia. Cyprus is located further west than it should be and Malta is shown disproportionally large so it appears on the map. The map has numerous indentations giving an appearance of geography rather than a flat design. Six fine lines cut across the map except where there is landmass and have a star at each end – reflecting the twelve stars on the flags of Europe. Across the map is the word EURO, and a large number 2 appears to the left hand side of the coin. The designer’s initials, LL, appear next to Cyprus. Luc Luycx designed the original coin, which was much the same except the design was only of the then 15 members in their entirety and showing border and no geographic features. The map was less detailed and the lines the stars were upon cut through where there would be landmass in eastern Europe if it were shown.
Metal – BiAlloy (Nk/Ng), ring Cupronickel (75% copper – 25% nickel clad on nickel core), center Nickel brass
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Luc Luycx (Reverse)
Edge – The €2 coin edge inscription is ‘S L O V E N I J A’, followed by an engraved dot
Mintage – 1,000,000
Diameter  –  25,70 mm
Weight – 8,52 gr
Interesting Facts – The coin commemorates the 200th anniversary of the opening of Ljubljana’s Botanical Garden, the oldest scientific and cultural institution in Slovenia.

Botanical Garden Slovenia

Established in 1810, the Ljubljana Botanical Gardens are Slovenia’s oldest cultural, scientific and educational institution operating uninterruptedly since its foundation. The Gardens contain more than 4,500 different species and subspecies. One third of them are endemic to Slovenia, while the rest originate from other parts of Europe and other continents. The Gardens, collaborating with more than 270 botanical gardens worldwide, are involved in scientific research and educational activities. They play an important role in the growing and protection of Slovenia’s endemic, endangered, vulnerable and rare species. Schedule 1 April – 31 October: 7:00-19:00 daily 1 November – 31 March: 7:00-17:00 daily June till August: 7:00-20:00 daily Location Ljubljana Botanical Gardens’ sections Arboretum: A part of the Gardens dominated by trees. Plant System: A section where plants are arranged in the form of the tree of life according to their evolutionary relationships. Ecological Groups: An area planted mainly with marsh and water species requiring special conditions for growth outside their natural habitat. Ecological and Geographical Groups: A section where mainly plant species from mountain and karst areas are sorted according to their geographical origin. Glasshouse: A section housing mainly tropical plant species, which require high air moisture levels and more or less even temperatures throughout the year. Cultivation Section: A plant bed section used for the research, cultivation and propagation of plants to be transplanted to other parts of the Gardens. 
Value – 3,40 euros http://www.fleur-de-coin.com/eurocoins/slovenia-2-euro-coins.asp
Denomination –  2 Euros
Country –  Slovenia
Year –  2011
Head Of State – Prime Minister Borut Pahor
Mint – Rahapaja Oy, in Helsinki-Vantaa, Finland
Obverse – The center of the coin shows at the left side (Franc Rozman) his effigy with a fivepointed star and at the right side his name, the name of the country, his year of birth and death and the year of emission, 2011. The rim contains the twelve European stars.
Reverse – The reverse (used from 2007 onwards) was designed by Luc Luycx and displays a map of Europe, not including Iceland and cutting off, in a semi-circle, at the Bosporus, north through the middle of Ukraine and Belarus and through northern Scandinavia. Cyprus is located further west than it should be and Malta is shown disproportionally large so it appears on the map. The map has numerous indentations giving an appearance of geography rather than a flat design. Six fine lines cut across the map except where there is landmass and have a star at each end – reflecting the twelve stars on the flags of Europe. Across the map is the word EURO, and a large number 2 appears to the left hand side of the coin. The designer’s initials, LL, appear next to Cyprus. Luc Luycx designed the original coin, which was much the same except the design was only of the then 15 members in their entirety and showing border and no geographic features. The map was less detailed and the lines the stars were upon cut through where there would be landmass in eastern Europe if it were shown.
Metal – BiAlloy (Nk/Ng), ring Cupronickel (75% copper – 25% nickel clad on nickel core), center Nickel brass
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Edi Berk (Obverse) – Luc Luycx (Reverse)
Edge – The €2 coin edge inscription is ‘S L O V E N I J A’, followed by an engraved dot
Mintage – 971,000 – 15,000 in coincards – 14,000 proof
Diameter  –  25,70 mm
Weight – 8,52 gr
Interesting Facts – Franc Rozman,nicknamed Stane (1911–1944), was a Slovenian Yugoslav partisan commander in World War II. In Slovenia he is considered a national hero. In the spring of 1942 Rozman became the commander of a Slovene partisan brigade established on April 5 1942 at Kremenik in Lower Carniola, and numbering more than 300 fighters. Measured by composition, organization, training, and fighting power, this was the most powerful Slovene partisan unit at that time. On 13 July 1943, he became a commander of the High Command of the Slovene partisan army with the rank of lieutenant general, which he held up to his death. Rozman died in White Carniola as a consequence of a serious wound received while testing new mortar weapons sent to the partisans by their British Allies.
Denomination –   1 Cent (0,01 Euro)
Country –  Belgium
Year –  1999
Head Of State – King Albert II of Belgium
Mint – Royal Belgian Mint (Monnaie Royale de Belgique)
Obverse – The Belgian euro coins feature only a single design for all eight coins: the portrait or effigy of King Albert II of Belgium and his royal monogram (a capital ‘A’ underneath a crown). Also part of the design are the 12 stars of the EU and the year of imprint.
Albert II (Albert Felix Humbert Theodore Chretien Eugene Marie) was born on June 6, 1934. He is the current King of the Belgians and a constitutional monarch, member of the former ducal house of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
Reverse – Globe in the bottom left. The (initial design:2002) then-fifteen members of the EU are lightly highlighted . Six fine lines cut diagonally behind the globe from each side of the coin and have twelve stars at their ends (reflective of the flags of Europe). To the top left is a large number 1 followed, in smaller text, by the words “Euro Cent”. The designers initials, LL, appear to the right of the globe.
Metal – 94,35% Steel – 5,65% Copper
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Obverse: Jan Alfons Keustermans (Director of the Municipal Academy of Fine Arts of Turnhout) – Reverse : Luc Lyucx
Catalogue – KM#224
Edge – Plain
Mintage – 235,200,000
Diameter  –  16,20 mm
Weight – 2,27 gr
Interesting Facts –  In Belgium, the euro was introduced in 2002. However, the first sets of coins were minted, as preparation, in 1999. Hence the first euro coins of Belgium have minted the year 1999 instead of 2002. Exchange rate established at €1 = 40.3399 BEF on 31 December 1998
Participation yielded upon Euro adoption.This design was amended in 2008 to comply with a recent European Central Bank regulation, which states, in part, ‘The national sides of all denominations of the euro circulation coins should bear an indication of the issuing Member State by means of the Member State’s name or an abbreviation of it.’.
Approx. Value –0,19 $(Unc) (as of January 2012)
Denomination –   1 Cent (0,01 Euro)
Country –  France
Year –  1999
Head Of State – President Jacques René Chirac
Mint – Paris
Obverse – Marianne embodies the desire for a sound and lasting Europe. She is the national emblem of France, a personification of Liberty and Reason. She symbolises the “Triumph of the Republic”, a bronze sculpture overlooking the Place de la Nation in Paris.
Reverse – Globe in the bottom left. The (initial design:2002) then-fifteen members of the EU are lightly highlighted . Six fine lines cut diagonally behind the globe from each side of the coin and have twelve stars at their ends (reflective of the flags of Europe). To the top left is a large number 1 followed, in smaller text, by the words “Euro Cent”. The designers initials, LL, appear to the right of the globe.
Metal – 94,35% Steel – 5,65% Copper
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator –  Fabienne Courtiade – Luc Lyucx
Catalogue – KM# 1282
Edge – Plain
Mintage – 404,000,000
Diameter  –  16,20 mm
Weight – 2,27 gr
Interesting Facts – Marianne symbolizes the “Triumph of the Republic”. The Triumph of the Republic is a bronze sculpture that overlooks the Place de la Nation in Paris. The profile of the Marianne can be seen on the official seal of the country. The symbol is engraved on French Euro coins and in French postage stamps. The symbol was also featured on the former French Franc banknotes and coins. 
Marianne was earlier used on pro-Republican iconography. She was heavily caricatured by anti-Republicans. 

During the classical times it was common practice to represent ideas and abstract entities through means such as Goddesses, Gods and allegorical personifications. This practice was not very common during the Middle Ages. It came back into practice during Renaissance. The French Revolution was a period, when, many allegorical personifications of ‘Liberty’ and ‘Reason’ were made. The figures of ‘Liberty’ and ‘Reason’ were merged into one. It was a female figure that was depicted either sitting or standing. Various attributes such as the cockerel, the Phrygian Cap and tricolor cockade accompanied the female figure. 

The woman symbolized many things. These included Liberty, the Nation, Reason, the Homeland and the civic virtues of the Republic. 

Some other powerful national symbols that represent France include Blue-White-Red, Liberté-Egalité-Fraternité and the Republic. All these national symbols have been combined in a new “identifier” that was created by the French government of Lionel Jospin.

Approx. Value –0,36 $(Unc)

Walking Liberty Coin U.S.A. PCGS MS-69 1oz of Silver

Denomination –  Walking Liberty Half Dollar (0,50 Cents)
Country –  U.S.A.
Year – 2011
Head Of State – President Barack Obama
Mint – San Francisco
Obverse – Lady Liberty walking and holding branches;United States flag over shoulder
Reverse – A bald eagle rising from a mountaintop perch
Metal – 99,93 Silver – 0,07 Copper
Condition – Uncirculated – PCGS Certified and Graded MS-69
Creator – Adolph A. Weinman (Obverse) – John Mercanti (Reverse)
Edge – Reeded
Mintage – 950,000 (Proof)
Collection – Giannis Koromilas
Diameter  – 40,60 mm
Weight – 31,10 gr
Interesting Facts – The Walking Liberty Half Dollar was introduced in 1916 to replace the Barber Half Dollars series, which concluded in the previous year. The new series was the result of a design contest for a new half dollar. The winner of the contest was Adolph A. Weinman, who was also the winner of a contest to redesign the dime. His new design for the half dollar was extremely popular and has become an iconic representation of America.The obverse design of the Walking Liberty Half Dollar features a full figure of Liberty in a flowing gown with an American flag draped around her shoulders. As the series name suggests, she is walking forward, appearing as facing left on the coin. One arm is outstretched and the other holds a bouquet of olive branches. The sun is rising before her with with inscription “Liberty” widely spaced above and “In God We Trust” behind her.The reverse design of the coin features an eagle facing left, perched on a rock ledge with a twisted branch extending. The eagle’s wings are raised in a stance described as defiant or perhaps ready to take flight. “United States of America” appears above with “E Pluribus Unum” to the left of the eagle and the denomination “Half Dollar” below.

The Walking Liberty Half Dollar series contains a number of lower mintage dates which are considered key dates or semi-key dates. The two lowest mintage coins are among the  1921 Walking Liberty Half Dollars. The mintages for the Philadelphia and Denver strikes were 246,000 and 208,000, respectively. Other low mintage issues include the 1916, 1916-S, 1921-S, and 1938-D.

Proof coins were struck for the series only from 1936 to 1942. The mintage for the first proof issue was a mere 3,901 coins, but the figure steadily rose each year until 21,120 proof coins were minted in 1942. After that year, the production of proof coinage was suspended.

The Walking Liberty Half Dollar series concluded in 1947, when it was replaced by the Franklin Half Dollar. This design change also completed the transition from depictions of Liberty on circulating American coinage to depictions of historical Americans. The Walking Liberty design was later used on the American Silver Eagle bullion coin series, which began in 1986.

Walking Liberty Halves, “Walkers” as they are frequently called, are heavily collected due to their beauty.  They hold great appeal for traditional collectors as well as non collectors.  Over 485 million of these coins were produced between 1916 and 1947 with many that still exist in MS65 condition or better.  A full set of 65 different date-and-mint combinations can be bought for around $1000 in average circulated condition (AG-VG for earlier years and F to XF for later years) making this series achievable for many collectors.  As always, coins in higher grades and mint state condition will command huge premiums. 

You can also start with what is called the short set with are coins dated from 1941 to 1947 which is 20 coins.  Acquiring these in better grades can be very rewarding. 

One thing to look for in high grades is weakness of strike.  Most dates are weakly struck, particularly on Liberty’s left hand and leg, head and skirt lines and on the eagle’s breast and leg feathers. As you would guess, sharply struck coins typically demand substantial premiums. An effort to improve this issue was attempted by Chief Engraver George T. Morgan in 1918 and again by Assistant Engraver John R. Sinnock in 1937 and 1938. None of the revisions seemed to help though as later issues were still weak in the central parts of the design. Places to check for wear and weakness include Liberty’s head, breast, arms and left leg and the breast, leg and forward wing of the eagle.

Value – 59,95 USD http://silvereagleguide.com/2011-silver-eagle/


2011 2 Euro Commemorative Fernao Mendes Pinto

Denomination –  2 Euros
Country –  Portugal
Year –  2011
Head Of State – Prime Minister Pedro Manuel Mamede Passos Coelho
Mint – Lisbon (Imprensa Nacional – Casa da Moeda)
Obverse – This issue celebrates the 500th Anniversary of the birth of Portuguese explorer and writer Fernão Mendes Pinto.Fernão Mendes Pinto (1511—1583) was a Portuguese adventurer and author of the Peregrinação (The Travels of Mendes Pinto), a literary masterpiece depicting the impression made on a European by Asian civilization, notably that of China, in the 16th century. Pinto went to India in 1537 and later claimed to have traveled, fought, and traded in almost every part of Asia during the next 21 years and also to have experienced drastic reversals of fortune, having been made “13 times a prisoner and 17 a slave.”
Reverse – The reverse (used from 2007 onwards) was designed by Luc Luycx and displays a map of Europe, not including Iceland and cutting off, in a semi-circle, at the Bosporus, north through the middle of Ukraine and Belarus and through northern Scandinavia. Cyprus is located further west than it should be and Malta is shown disproportionally large so it appears on the map. The map has numerous indentations giving an appearance of geography rather than a flat design. Six fine lines cut across the map except where there is landmass and have a star at each end – reflecting the twelve stars on the flags of Europe. Across the map is the word EURO, and a large number 2 appears to the left hand side of the coin. The designer’s initials, LL, appear next to Cyprus. Luc Luycx designed the original coin, which was much the same except the design was only of the then 15 members in their entirety and showing border and no geographic features. The map was less detailed and the lines the stars were upon cut through where there would be landmass in eastern Europe if it were shown.
Metal – BiAlloy (Nk/Ng), ring Cupronickel (75% copper – 25% nickel clad on nickel core), center Nickel brass
Condition – Uncirculated
Creator – Luc Luycx (Reverse)
Edge – Five coats of arms and seven castles equally spaced
Mintage – 520,000
Diameter  –  25,70 mm
Weight – 8,52 gr
Interesting Facts – Extremely low mintage quantity for a euro coin. Over the years the value is expected to rise. The characteristics of these coins were approved by Executive Order No 253/2011, published in the Official Gazette, Series I – No 121 of 27 June 2011 and Executive Order No 185/2011, published in the Official Gazette, Series I – No 88 of 6 May 2011.
Value – Taken from several coin websites at (12/1/2012)

On the 22th of Februry the new 25 euro coin from Austria is expected. It will have a diameter of 34,00mm, weighting 16.5 grams. Its composition will be an alloy of Silver and Niobium. Its mintage quantity will be 65.000 coins while its theme will be Bionics. Check the picture for one of the most beautiful coin designs seen over the last years.

One a Penny

One a penny,
Two a penny,
Three a penny,
More,
Four a penny,
Five a penny,
That’s a nickel more.

Six a penny,
Seven a penny,
Eight a penny,
More,
Nine a penny,
Ten a penny,
That’s a dime for the store!


Four Bright Coins

Four bright coins shining at me,
The first one said, “I’m a penny you see.”
The second one said, “How do you do?
I’m called a nickel, and I’m bigger than you!”
The third one said, “You’re both small stuff,
If you want to buy something, you’re not enough!
But look at me, I’m small, and I shine,
I can buy something cuz I’m a dime.”
The last coin looked at them all and laughed,
“All of you together don’t measure up to me,
Cuz I’m a quarter, can’t you see?”


Money Rhymes

Twenty five cents,
Money that rhymes,
Take one nickel
Add two dimes.

Three fat nickels,
One thin dime.
Makes twenty-five cents
Every time.

Five fat nickels,
No thin dimes.
Makes twenty-five cents
Any time.

Poems taken by CanTeach website, URL, http://www.canteach.ca/elementary/songspoems70.html

A Coin

Your western heads here cast on money,
You are the two that fade away together,
Partners in the mist.

Lunging buffalo shoulder,
Lean Indian face,
We who come after where you are gone
Salute your forms on the new nickel.

You are
To us:
The past.

Runners
On the prairie:
Good-by.

Carl Sandburg

The Coin

Into my heart’s treasury
I slipped a coin
That time cannot take
Nor a thief purloin, —

Oh better than the minting
Of a gold-crowned king
Is the safe-kept memory
Of a lovely thing.

Sarah Teasdale

Taken by website Poem Hunter, URL, http://www.poemhunter.com

James Barton Longacre

James Barton Longacre

James Barton Longacre (1794 – 1869) was born and died in Pennsylvania. Longacre was chief engraver for the U.S. Mint from 1844 until his death.

Longacre’s most famous design is the Indian Head Cent. He also designed the Flying Eagle Cent (influenced by Gobrecht), two cent piece, three cent nickel, shield nickel, $1 Liberty Head, $1 and $3 Indian Princess and the $20 Liberty Double Eagle. He also designed many patterns and coins for both the U.S. and other countries.

Article taken from website CarlsCoins URL, http://www.carlscoins.com/Coin%20Designers.htm